Author Archives: Mollie

2015: 01/16-01/18 Whole Hog Butchery & Charcuterie Weekend Workshop

East Topsham
Registration required by 1/10/15, limited spaces

Galusha Hill Farm & Lodge, a 600-acre farm retreat high on a hill in East Topsham Vermont, offers a nose-to-tail butchery and charcuterie workshop January 16-18, 2015, the first in an educational series of organic farming and food weekends at the estate. Guided by guest Chef Dave Johnson of Rhode Island, participants learn to breakdown a heritage Berkshire hog, turn it into sausage, ham, and bacon, and prepare a porcine dinner feast—while enjoying luxurious accommodations in the newly completed lodge and conference center.

Farm manager John Harkins, who raises heritage breed pigs and sheep, certified organic vegetables, garlic, apples, and open-pollinated heirloom seeds, will talk about how to raise organic, pastured pigs using a traditional forest-grazing system. The Berkshire hog to be processed in this class has been raised on the farm and humanely slaughtered at a local meat processing facility.

Chef Dave Johnson gained his appreciation for the farm-to-table movement while working at two of Providence Rhode Island’s finest kitchens, Farmstead and Local 121; he currently works for Whole Foods Market. As executive chef of Local 121 Chef Johnson directed a staff of ten in the development and execution of seasonally changing menus and a successful charcuterie program that specialized in nose-to-tail butchery. In this hands-on workshop he’ll lead the group through the traditional arts of butchery and charcuterie, from breaking down the animal into primal cuts, making pork cures, sausage, bacon and ham, to learning about dry-curing and smoking. The group will learn additional cooking techniques while working together to prepare a farm-to-table dinner, featuring organic pork and vegetables from the farm.

The weekend package starts Friday night, January 16 with an 8 PM orientation, and includes two night’s accommodations in one of nine private guestrooms in the 12,000 square foot lodge—with breathtaking mountain views from the deck. In between meals and workshops participants can enjoy cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, and walking on the many trails on the property, use the spa, take a sauna, or relax with a good book. The program concludes after breakfast on Sunday, January 18. Registration is limited to twelve participants.

To register by January 10, contact estate manager Jack Palmer at Galusha Hill Farm Lodge at 802-584-3061 or email jack@galushahillfarmlodge.com. Visit http://www.muddycastle.blogspot.com/ for additional program details and www.galushahillfarm.org for directions to the farm.


12/10 Alert: Inspired in spite of darkness

December 10, 2014
directorDear Members & Friends: 

The winter darkness is still deepening, this week’s sloppy wet snowstorm was a royal pain in the @#! BUT…
I am so inspired and energized by everything that is bubbling up in our network of farmers, activists and eaters I look forward to every day.Please jump right down this message to:

Meet Lucy, a great new addition to our staff
Volunteer to help us jump start the new year
Hear from Barbara about her approach to gift giving
Take our Survey (if you’re a raw milk producer)
See Vermonters protesting the DARK Act in DC
Tell the FDA where to go – on FSMA

And stay snug, stay safe, and stay inspired!

Andrea

P.S. Spread the word: We’re still seeking a couple of intrepid INTERNS for Winter 2015! How to apply and full descriptions available here.

“Protest beyond the law is not a departure from democracy; it is absolutely essential to it.”

Howard Zinn

LucyRural Vermont Welcomes new Community Organizer/Advocate, Lucy Hankinson!
Lucy Hankinson

We’re all thrilled to have a new staff member join our team. Lucy Hankinson, who hails from Hyde Park where she grew up on her family’s dairy and horse farm, became our new Organizer/Advocate on Dec. 1st.

Lucy believes strongly in creating local resilience through sustainable food practices. She became interested in working to change food policy to support the needs and wants of farmers and their communities while interning with Salvation Farms in 2008. After earning a Master’s in Public Administration to gain experience in the policy realm, she served as a Sustainable Agriculture volunteer in Peace Corps to better understand a truly sustainable community.  After a year of hands-on experience working for the US Congress, she is excited to be a part of Rural Vermont.

You can say hello to Lucy by sending a note to lucy@ruralvermont.org. Stay tuned for opportunities to meet Lucy at upcoming events.

VolunteerURGENT: WE NEED VOLUNTEERS!
Did you know that Rural Vermont accepts no government funding? And no corporate money, either? The majority of our funding comes from individuals! And so, while almost every organization sends out an end-of-the-year fundraising appeal, Rural Vermont depends on these contributions to get our new year off to a strongstart.

And it’s especially important this year, because we’ll be celebrating our 30th Anniversary in 2015 and our ambitious goals are to grow our membership and raise significant new financial support.

Here’s how you can help ensure the success of this oh-so-critical mailing:
1 – Come to the office in Montpelier for a stuff & stamp PARTY (really!) on Monday, December 15th from 4:30-6:30. We provide drinks, snacks, and fun company! We also need help to get the mailing out the door on Wednesday, December 17th anytime between 9AM and 3PM.
2 – You can even help from the comfort of your home, by making EASY (and fun) follow-up phone calls to fellow Rural Vermont supporters!
If you can help, please be in touch with Shelby or call (802) 223-7222 and ask for Mollie.

BarbaraHAVE YOU MET BARBARA YET?

Barbara Bruno gardens, raises chickens, works at a high-school preparing developmentally-delayed students for adult life, and she’s a Rural Vermont member.

Barbara Bruno
“After breathing air and drinking water, eating is my favorite activity – one that leads toward enjoying life and staying healthy. The ability to feed my family produce, milk, cheese and meat from farms not far from my home in Montpelier is important to me.
I’m a member of Rural Vermont because they support the farmers that make my quality of life possible.

I know a young farming couple and I wanted to do more than buy their milk, so I made a gift to Rural Vermont in their honor. I was able to say thank you, for  the milk and for the care put into the product that nourishes me and my family, in that simple way. You can do the same.” 

 

Join Barbara and make your year-end Rural Vermont contribution today, or  give a Rural Vermont gift in honor of someone who shares the belief that family farms and the real food that they provide are the foundation of healthy communities and the social and environmental sustainability we all need to thrive. (If your gift recipient isn’t already a Rural Vermont member, your contribution of any amount will make them one!)

Make a gift in honor of someone special and we’ll send you this card, designed by Ryan Hayes, to pass along to the recipient. (More details about Rural Vermont Gift Contributions on this page)

IssueUpdatesISSUE UPDATES

SurveyAttention Raw Milk Producers!

Rural Vermont is conducting its 5th annual Raw Milk Production Survey.

Since 2009, when VT’s Raw Milk Law was originally passed, Rural Vermont has compiled and presented an annual report to the Legislature on how that law is working for farmers and customers.This survey is a crucial step in preparing that report. The data collected also helps Rural Vermont develop its strategy for our on-going campaign for fair treatment of raw milk producers and their customers.

If you are a raw milk producer (or were one during the past year), you can access an electronic version of the survey, or a downloadable PDF, on our website. Please share with other raw dairy producers in your area, and please note that ALL information is kept strictly confidential.

If you have questions or need assistance accessing the survey please contact Lucy or call the Rural Vermont office at 223-7222.

Protestors from dozens of states gathered on Dec 10 at the Capitol
ProtestVermonters Join National Protest of the DARK Act in DCVermont activists traveled to Washington, DC to join hundreds from around the country in a national protest against the “DARK Act” (Deny Americans the Right to Know) known by its promoters as H.R. 4432 “The Safe & Accurate Food Labeling Act of 2014 and sponsored by Rep. Mike Pompeo (R) Kansas. The bill, which had a hearing Dec. 10th before the House Sub-Committee on Health of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, if passed, would pre-empt Vermont’s first in the nation, no strings attached GMO Food Labeling law along with other states’ rights.

 

VT Right to Know GMOs Coalition leaders Will Allen, Cat Buxton and Rep. Kate Webb traveled to DC to join the protest and Rep. Webb offered testimony to the House sub-committee.

 

Cat Buxton, community organizer with the VT Right to Know Coalition reported from DC, “Hundreds of people from dozens of states filled the halls of the Rayburn House Office Building. They were seeking entry to the hearing on the “DARK Act” (H.R. 4432). Hundreds more who want states to be able to decide for themselves how best to protect and inform their citizens rallied outside. It is clear that we will not be silenced; we will not be kept in the dark. This movement, of the people, is only just beginning.”

 

You can see an album of photos from the protest on the VT Right to Know Facebook page and also learn more about the DARK Act on the VTRTK website.

 

FSMALAST CHANCE To Tell the FDA Where to Go – on FSMA 
IT IS CRUCIAL FOR FARMERS & EATERS TO SUBMIT COMMENTS TO THE FDA.

The deadline for submitting comments on the revised proposed FSMA rules is Monday, December 15, 2014.

Use this link to submit your comments on the Produce Rule:
http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FDA-2011-N-0921-0973

Use this link to submit your comments on the Preventive Control Rule:
http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FDA-2011-N-0920-1553

Once again Vern Grubinger, of UVM Extension and the VT Vegetable and Berry Growers Association, has done a terrific job of boiling this complex issue down to some key concerns. Read his “Four Flaws with the FSMA Draft Rules for Produce Growers.” Vern illustrates how simply telling YOUR story to explain what concerns you about the proposed FSMA rules is a great way to contribute comments.     

Rural Vermont will be submitting comments and we hope you will add your voice.

Below is a list of organizations offering additional resources for submitting comments.

PLEASE PARTICIPATE – YOUR VOICE MATTERS

New England Farmers Union

National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition – They offer easy to use templates for both farmers and consumers to make comments.

VT Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets

If you need assistance, please contact Andrea Stander or call the Rural Vermont office at 802-223-7222

RECENT NEWS:

UPCOMING EVENTS & LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES:

WINTER  

IS OUR GROWING SEASON!

Just as the fields and gardens are being put to bed, all of us at Rural Vermont are gearing up for a winter full of action and growth.

Please join
our community of farmers and their allies who believe economic justice for family farmers is the foundation of environmental and social sustainability.
You can help
us educate, organize and advocate for commonsense policies that are fair and counter corporate control of our food supply.

We’re on a quest
to grow Rural Vermont’s membership to 1000 strong and to raise an additional $60,000 for our 30th Anniversary in 2015.
MAKE YOUR YEAR-END CONTRIBUTION TODAY! (if you’re not a member already, your contribution in any amount is welcome and will make you one!)

Burlington Free Press: VT activists to fight ban on state GMO laws

Associated Press
December 10, 2014
Full Article

A state representative and some activists will travel to Washington in a bid to stop a federal law that would pre-empt states like Vermont from requiring labels on genetically modified foods.

Rep. Kate Webb, a Shelburne Democrat and a key backer of the GMO labeling bill that passed in Vermont this year, is set to testify Wednesday before a U.S. House committee. She’s then expected to participate in a rally in downtown Washington aimed at stopping the legislation sponsored by Rep. Mike Pompeo, a Kansas Republican.

In Vermont, meanwhile, local activists have set a 3:30 p.m. news conference for the Hunger Mountain food co-op in Montpelier with the same purpose in mind.


Give the Gift of Rural Vermont!

gift tagDo you have a friend, family member, colleague, neighbor or local farmer you want to celebrate in a meaningful and socially responsible way?  Give a Rural Vermont gift in honor of someone who shares the belief that family farms and the real food that they provide are the foundation of healthy communities and the social and environmental sustainability we all need to thrive.

Learn more about gift contributions, and why Barbara Bruno annually honors her farmers with a Rural Vermont gift.

Give a gift contribution and we’ll send you this card, designed by Ryan Hayes, to pass along to the recipient.


Why are YOU a Rural Vermont Supporter?

Meet Hadley Stock

Hadley Stock

Hadley Stock

She owns Pink Boot Farm with her husband and two daughters; she owns Farm Store, a market in Manchester that showcases local foods; and she is a Rural Vermont member.

“Rural Vermont is an amazing organization working with, and for, Vermont farmers and eaters to help make farm to table eating more possible for all of us. There are lots of laws out there that make it nearly impossible to get amazing local food on your tables. Rural Vermont goes to bat for us to help make these laws more reasonable so we can all enjoy the bounty this amazing state has to offer without breaking the law… Please take a minute to check out what they are all about and if you feel strongly about this stuff, make your contribution to Rural Vermont today. Every bit helps these guys keep doing what they do, so people like me can keep doing what I do!”

Join Hadley and make your Rural Vermont contribution today in support of common-sense, scale-appropriate public policy that creates economic opportunity for farmers and food choice and access for consumers.

Meet Susan and Ryan Hayes

Susan & Ryan Hayes. Photo credit: 7 Days

Susan & Ryan Hayes. Photo credit: 7 Days

They own the Farm of Milk & Honey, a small, grass-based, organically managed raw milk micro-dairy in Washington, and they are Rural Vermont members.

“We often reach out to our friends at Rural Vermont for advice and ideas. As the year was coming to an end, we reflected on how integral they have become to our farm and our business.

Their advocacy around raw milk and other key issues of importance to us (like on-farm slaughter & GMO labeling) has brought about real change in the state. And through their work, they have cultivated a community of committed producers and consumers who collaborate to address common challenges.

Rural Vermont is an inspiring, passionate group of people who are helping to sustain Vermont’s agricultural landscape and we are so lucky to have them as friends, supporters, and advocates. We urge you to become a member or make your special contribution today!

Want to see more real change? Join the Hayes and become part of Rural Vermont’s growing community of producers and consumers by making your special contribution to Rural Vermont today.

Meet Susan Ritz

Susan Ritz

Susan Ritz

She writes, teaches writing, and cheers on many wonderful organizations in Central Vermont, including Rural Vermont.

I’ve been an enthusiastic member of Rural Vermont for more than 15 years. I’ve seen Rural Vermont grow and change along with the needs of the farmers who rely on it to be their advocate inside the Capitol and further afield. I’ve benefitted from their work to bring farm fresh food directly to my plate … creating markets for Vermont farmers.

I really believe that Rural Vermont is a big reason Vermont is seeing an increase in the number of its farms for the first time in decades. This has all happened because Rural Vermont listens to its members and constituents, then goes to bat for them. I’m proud that my annual donation helps make this happen. Join me in supporting this hardworking organization.”

Read more about Susan’s perspective on Rural Vermont’s evolution over the many years she has been a member.

Join Susan and make your year-end Rural Vermont contribution today and support the grassroots approach that makes Rural Vermont both unique and effective in its work to cultivate a prosperous land-based economy and rich community life.

Meet Carl Russell

carl russell, credit corey hendricksonWith his family, he owns and operates Earthwise Farm & Forest in Bethel, and has been active with Rural Vermont for half its lifetime (15 years!). Carl is the Chair of the Rural Vermont Board of Directors, and shares a seat with his wife, Lisa McCrory.

Rural Vermont works to restore economic prosperity and social justice in Vermont’s rural land-based economy. These efforts support prudent use of our rural lands, and the subsequent delivery of ecological goods and services to all Vermonters.

Ecological goods and services such as clean air, abundant fresh water, enlivened soils, and attractive landscapes are produced from healthy ecosystems.

Throughout the hills of Vermont, there are small and medium sized farms and forestry enterprises providing ecological goods and services through good stewardship practices. Most do not compete on a regional scale, and many depend on direct sales to consumers.

Regulation that impedes direct sale of farm fresh products inhibits rural economic prosperity and restricts families from using small scale, low cost, and traditional practices, pressuring producers into business models that lead to increased environmental impact.

Whether you live in an urban or rural area, you can protect your own interests in wholesome food, vital ecosystems, and a vibrant rural landscape when you make your year-end contribution to Rural Vermont today.”

Invest in clean air, abundant fresh water, enlivened soils, and attractive landscapes – join Carl and make your year-end Rural Vermont contribution today.

Meet Barbara Bruno

Barbara Bruno

Barbara Bruno

She gardens, raises chickens, works at a high-school preparing developmentally-delayed students for adult life, and she’s a Rural Vermont member.

“After breathing air and drinking water, eating is my favorite activity – one that leads toward enjoying life and staying healthy. The ability to feed my family produce, milk, cheese and meat from farms not far from my home in Montpelier is important to me. I’m a member of Rural Vermont because they support the farmers that make my quality of life possible.

I know a young farming couple and I wanted to do more than buy their milk, so I made a gift to Rural Vermont in their honor. I was able to say thank you, for  the milk and for the care put into the product that nourishes me and my family, in that simple way. You can do the same.”

Join Barbara and make your year-end Rural Vermont contribution today or give a Rural Vermont gift in honor of someone who shares Rural Vermont’s belief that family farms and the real food that they provide are the foundation of healthy communities and the social and environmental sustainability we all need to thrive.

Meet Meg Lucas & Barbi Schreiber

Meg Lucas & Barbi Schreiber

Meg Lucas & Barbi Schreiber

They publish the much-celebrated magazine Vermont’s Local Banquet and are members of Rural Vermont.

Rural Vermont is one of our favorite advocacy organizations! We were introduced to Rural Vermont in 2002 through our involvement with a group known as GEAG, the Genetic Engineering Action Group. Our fledgling group found a strong partner in Rural Vermont and, under their leadership, we worked on two pieces of GMO legislation at the statehouse. Along the way, we received an immeasurable education in the political process.

And to this day, Rural Vermont is continuously listening to and connecting with their member base by way of the superb educational and outreach events that they sponsor throughout the year, as well through the regular newsletter updates that are not only packed with pertinent info and calls to action, but a delight to read.

If you care about the food that you eat, the folks that produce it, the future of rural communities in Vermont, and ultimately a better world, we hope you will join us today and make your year-end contribution to support this vital organization and the significant work that they are doing.

Read more about what Meg and Barbi value about Rural Vermont’s approach to keeping its members involved, engaged, and active.

Join Meg and Barbi and make your year-end Rural Vermont contribution today and be part of the dynamic network of Rural Vermont supporters who are building a better world!

Tell us why YOU support Rural Vermont!

 

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Lexington Herald-Leader: Ky. Department of Agriculture looking for hemp growers for 2015

By Janet Patton
December 1, 2014
Full Article

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture is taking applications for next year’s industrial hemp pilot projects. Potential growers must apply by Jan. 1; farmers who are chosen will be notified in late January.

“The first round of pilot projects with the universities and individual farmers in 2014 yielded a tremendous amount of data about production methods, seed varieties, harvesting and processing techniques, and uses for the harvested hemp,” Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said in a statement.

“We’re looking to conduct a wide scope of pilot projects in 2015. When the day comes that commercial hemp production is open to all producers and processors in Kentucky, we want to be ready.”

Hemp was grown in 2014 for the first time since it was outlawed decades ago along with marijuana, which has far more of the high-inducing chemical THC. Several research plots were grown by universities, and a handful of farmers grew private plots. Results of the research projects are likely to be released by the end of January.

To grow hemp, applicants must provide the physical address of the production fields and anywhere the hemp will be processed or stored.


Brattleboro Reformer: Stonyfield drops out of trade group opposing GMO law

By John Herrick, VTDigger
12/5/14
Full Article

MONTPELIER >> New Hampshire-based Stonyfield Farm is one of two organic dairy producers that have withdrawn from a trade group seeking to overturn Vermont’s GMO labeling law. The other is California’s Clover Stornetta Farms.

The companies say they are “under fire” from consumers who support the policy, according to a letter sent to the head of the International Dairy Foods Association.

Vermont’s GMO law would require labeling of certain food products containing genetically engineered ingredients starting in 2016. The IDFA is one of four trade groups that have filed suit against Vermont, arguing the law is unconstitutional. the lead plaintiff is the Grocery Manufacturers Association.

“Our decision to stop our membership wasn’t that hard, honestly,” said Britt Lundgren, director of organic and sustainable agriculture at Stonyfield Farm. “I don’t view this as a big loss for us. Stonyfield is a strong supporter of GMO labeling across the country.”

On July 8, an organic faction appeared within the IDFA when five members, all represented by another organic trade group, sent a letter to the association’s president to express their “deep concern and unhappiness” with IDFA’s decision to participate in the lawsuit.

“We are not clear why IDFA entered the lawsuit, as the labeling law does not affect dairy ingredients. As near as we can tell, this was an internal decision, with little or no consideration for the diverse interests of the membership,” the letter states.

“I hope that IDFA takes this as message that they do need to do a better job of reaching out to all of their stakeholders,” Lundgren said.

But others, including Horizon Organic, Aurora Organic Dairy and Organic Valley, will retain their membership with the IDFA. They are also members of the Organic Trade Association, a vocal proponent of state GMO labeling initiatives.

“We still belong to the IDFA,” wrote Sara Loveday, a spokesperson for Horizon Organic, which is a subsidiary of the Denver, Colorado-based WhiteWave Foods Company, in an email to VTDigger. “But the organization has agreed that our dues have not and will not be used for anti-labeling efforts.”

Horizon decided to stay with the IDFA in order to have a seat at the table, Loveday said.

“We believe that the most effective option for fighting the IDFA’s anti-labeling actions is to use the power of our memberships to voice our opposition to their approach. As you referenced, we have made it clear to the IDFA that we do not approve of their decision to join GMA’s lawsuit against the state of Vermont, and we are in ongoing discussions with them about their position,” Loveday wrote.

Peggy Armstrong, a spokeswoman for the IDFA, said as far as she knows, no other members have withdrawn.

Though dairy products are exempt under the law, many producers use sweeteners, such as corn syrup, which often comes from genetically engineered crops. Even a company like WhiteWave, which owns Horizon Organic, has products in its portfolio that contain GMOs, a spokesperson said.

Some companies oppose the state labeling law, but prefer a uniform national policy. The trade groups in the lawsuit argue a patchwork of labeling creates a costly logistical obstacle for food producers..

Laura Batcha, CEO and executive director for the Organic Trade Association, which represents some of IDFA’s members, said member companies have a right to voice their own perspective, as long as they do not publicly attack the trade association.

“Having a policy as a trade association doesn’t require a unanimity of thought,” Batcha said.

 


Meet Susan Ritz

Susan Ritz

Susan Ritz

She writes, teaches writing, and cheers on many wonderful organizations in Central Vermont, including Rural Vermont.

“Although I’m not a farmer, I’ve been an enthusiastic member of Rural Vermont for more than 15 years. I got to know the organization up close and personal for the decade I rented a little corner office in the back of their quarters in Montpelier. From there, I saw Rural Vermont grow and change along with the needs of the farmers who rely on it to be their advocate inside the Capitol and further afield.

In the 1990’s, I watched Rural Vermont partner with dairy farmers from all over the state to battle Monsanto over the use and labeling of BGST hormones in milk and plan events to raise money to keep the barn lights on when the electricity rates went sky high; and stand shoulder to shoulder with traditional family farmers as more and more small farms were faced with closure, helping them persevere in tough times.

Later, I watched Rural Vermont join forces with the new crop of young, ambitious organic farmers, taking up their own fight against spread of GMO’s, working first for a moratorium on their use and then triumphantly winning the nation’s first labeling laws last year. I cheered when they worked to ease regulations on the sale of raw milk and other “forbidden” foods. I’ve benefitted from their work to bring farm fresh food directly to my plate, into schools and into many local restaurants, creating markets for Vermont farmers.

I really believe that Rural Vermont is a big reason Vermont is seeing an increase in the number of its farms for the first time in decades. This has all happened because Rural Vermont listens to its members and constituents, then goes to bat for them. I’m proud that my annual donation helps make this happen. Join me in supporting this hardworking organization.”

– Susan Ritz


The Raw Food World: New study proves raw milk protects children from respiratory infections, fever, and inflammation of the middle ear

by Lynn Griffith
30 Nov, 2014
Full Article

(TRFW News) A large European study led by Professor Erika von Mutius reports that fresh, non-pasteurized cow’s milk actually protects children from respiratory infections, fever and inflammation of the middle ear. The study does acknowledge that untreated cow’s milk could contain pathogenic microorganisms that could pose a health risk, but researchers argue for different processing methods to be used to preserve the protective agents in raw milk.  (1,2,3)

Long-term study examines effects of raw milk on children’s health for their first year of life

This long-term study explored the role of dietary and environmental factors in developing allergic illness.  The study began with 1,000 pregnant women who were asked to document their children’s diet and health weekly for the first year of life. (1,2,3)

“Among children who were fed fresh, unprocessed cow’s milk, the incidence of head colds and other respiratory infections, fever and middle-ear inflammation was found to be significantly lower than the group whose milk ration consisted of the commercially processed ultra-pasteurized product,” says Dr. Georg Loss of Dr. von Hauner’s Hospital, first author of the new paper. (1,3)

Drinking farm milk reduced the risk of developing respiratory infections, fever, and middle-ear inflammation by 30 percent.  The effects of the milk diminished if milk was heated at home before drinking.  Conventional pasteurization retained the ability to reduce fever, but exposure to UHT processing eliminated this ability.  The positive impact of raw milk could easily be separated from the effects of other elements in the children’s diet. (1,3)

“The effects of diverse milk treatments are presumably attributable to differentially heat-resistant components present in fresh milk. Compounds that are sensitive to heat seem to play a particularly important role in protection against respiratory-tract and ear infections,” says Loss. (1,3)

Team suggests alternative processing to reduce risks and preserve health benefits of raw milk

At the end of the first year, researchers took blood samples from the children and tested for biochemical indicators of immune functioning.  Infants that were fed on unprocessed milk had lower levels of C-reactive protein.  (1,3)

“Other studies have shown that higher levels of inflammation are related to the subsequent emergence of chronic conditions such as asthma and obesity. Consumption of unprocessed milk may therefore reduce the risk of developing asthma,” Loss explains. (1,3)

Conventional pasteurization exposes milk to temperatures of 161-165 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 seconds.  Ultra-pasteurized milk is brought to 275 degrees Fahrenheit for a few seconds.  “Consumption of unprocessed milk itself is not entirely without risk,” says Loss. (1,3)

Milk not only contains fats and carbohydrates, but also proteins that modulate the immune system functioning.  “In many respects, the composition of cow’s milk is similar to that of human milk,” says Loss.  Breastfeeding has been known to protect infants from infections, and researchers believe that raw milk may promote healthy immune systems in the same way by altering the composition of gut microflora. (1,3)

Among the children of the study, only two percent had an allergy to milk or other food items prior to their first birthday.  The women and children who participated in the study lived in rural areas of Bavaria, Finland, France, Switzerland and Austria.  The study will continue to monitor these children for the first 10 years of life.   (1,3)

Sources for this article include:

(1) www.en.uni-muenchen.de
(2) www.jacionline.org
(3) www.sciencedaily.com


05/09-05/23 Organic Beekeeping Courses

Beginner and Advances courses
Metta Earth Institute, Lincoln
Fees and dates vary depending on course

Organic Beekeeping
for Beginners

Saturday and Sunday May 9 – 10, 2015
9:00am – 5:00pm
Fee: $110 per person

(includes course text: Natural Beekeeping 2nd Edition)

“The good folks at the Metta Earth Institute in Lincoln, Vermont have once again graciously made time for organic beekeeping classes this spring. Class size is limited to around 23 people on a first come first serve basis.
-Ross Conrad

This workshop provides an introduction for folks interested in small scale and part-time (backyard) beekeeping. The workshop will present a balanced view of natural and organic beekeeping topics and practices including: location and equipment requirements; basic honey bee biology; swarming as an expression of the bees vitality; overwintering; presence and mindfulness in the beeyard; non-toxic pest and disease control; an appreciation for the role that pollinators and beekeepers play within the Earth’s ecosystem, and more. The program will be punctuated with open hive demonstrations with the opportunity for hands-on experience by inexperienced students weather permitting.

Meals and accommodations may be pre-arranged separately with the Metta Earth Institute
(please call for more information) 802) 453-8111 and ask for Gillian.

Presenter:
Ross Conrad is a former president of the Vermont Beekeepers Association, a regular contributor to Bee Culture – The Magazine of American Beekeeping, and author of Natural Beekeeping: Organic Approaches To Modern Apiculture revised and expanded 2nd edition ((2013). Ross has given bee related presentations and taught organic beekeeping workshops and classes throughout North America for many years now. His small beekeeping business, Dancing Bee Gardens, supplies friends and neighbors with honey and candles among other bee related products, and provides bees for Vermont apple pollination in spring.
more about Ross…

Location:
Metta Earth Institute – Center For Contemplative Ecology, 334 Geary Road South, Lincoln, Vermont. 802-453-8111

For directions…

To register: contact Ross at dancingbhoney at gmail dot com, or call 802-349-4279

————————————————————————————————————————

Advanced Organic Beekeeping

Saturday May 23, 2015
All Day
Fee: $50 per person
For more information or to register call: 802-349-4279

This course will cover the ins and outs of swarms and working with swarms, Apitherapy: Health and healing with products from the hive (Honey, Pollen, Propolis, Bees Wax, Royal Jelly, and Bee Venom), and Developing a spiritual connection with the honey bee..

Presenter:
Ross Conrad is a former president of the Vermont Beekeepers Association, a regular contributor to Bee Culture – The Magazine of American Beekeeping, and author of Natural Beekeeping: Organic Approaches To Modern Apiculture revised and expanded 2nd edition. Ross has given bee related presentations and taught organic beekeeping workshops and classes throughout North America for many years now. His small beekeeping business, Dancing Bee Gardens, supplies friends and neighbors with honey and candles among other bee related products, and provides bees for Vermont apple pollination in spring.
more about Ross…

Location:
Metta Earth Institute -Center For Contemplative Ecology, 334 Geary Road South, Lincoln, Vermont. 802-453-8111

For directions…

To register: contact Ross at dancingbhoney at gmail dot com, or call 802-349-4279