Author Archives: Mollie

Know Where Your Food Comes From: A Band of 60 Davids Challenges Monsanto, the Goliath, in Federal Court

May 27th, 2011
Full Article

According to a Federal lawsuit recently filed by the Public Patent Foundation [www.pubpat.org] in the Southern District of New York on behalf of the Northeast Organic Farming Association/Massachusetts Chapter, Inc. [www.nofamass.org] and 59 other plaintiffs, Monsanto Corporation has bullied farmers who have  resisted its Round-Up Ready Technology [Organic Seed Growers & Trade Association, et al. v. Monsanto, 11 CIV 2163, Judge Naomi Buchwald). According to Daniel Ben Ravicher (University of Virginia Law School, 2001), lead attorney in the case and the Public Patent Foundation's Executive Director and Lecturer of Law at Cardozo School of Law in New York City, "it seems quite perverse that a farmer contaminated by [transgenic seed] could be accused of patent infringement, but Monsanto has made such accusations before and is notorious for having sued hundreds of farmers for patent infringement, so we had to act to protect the interests of our clients.”

Monsanto, with revenue of $10.5 billion and operating income of $1.6 billion in fiscal year 2010, is a Goliath in the “global proprietary seed market.”  It markets and sells transgenic seed (also known as genetically modified or genetically engineered seed), and according to the legal complaint, Monsanto sells Roundup Ready seed for corn, canola, soybean, sugar beet, alfalfa and cotton.  In the United States, plaintiffs assert that “Monsanto’s control of the seed market is so high that over 85-90% of all soybeans, corn, cotton, sugar beets and canola grown in the U.S. contains Monsanto’s patented genes.”

The plaintiffs are largely organic farmers and organic seed businesses who do not want to use or sell transgenic seed, as well as some non-organic farmers who wish to farm without transgenic seed.  Plaintiffs fear that they could be perversely accused by Monsanto of patent infringement and bring their lawsuit to obtain a declaratory judgment “to protect themselves from ever being accused of infringing patents on transgenic seed.”  They cite a long history of Monsanto aggressively asserting its patents for transgenic seeds against hundreds of farmers, including farmers who became contaminated by Monsanto’s transgenic seed through no fault of their own.  This fear “causes some of the farming plaintiffs to forgo growing certain crops, including corn, cotton, canola, sugar beets, soybeans and alfalfa, since it is widely known that those crops are currently under severe threat of transgenic seed contamination.”

The plaintiffs sketch out in detail the nature of Monsanto’s transgenic seeds and forcefully assert that “Society stands on the precipice of forever being bound to transgenic agriculture and transgenic food.”  Transgenic seeds are genetically engineered through the introduction of foreign genes and regulatory sequences into the seeds’ genome.  Monsanto’s most predominant transgenic trait is “glyphosate tolerance” which makes crops tolerant of Monsanto’s glyphosate-based herbicide called Roundup.  Roundup causes severe injury or destruction when applied to crops that are not glyphosate tolerant.

Plaintiffs claim that coexistence between transgenic seed and organic seed is impossible because transgenic seed contaminates and eventually overcomes organic seed.  Organic canola has become virtually extinct as a result of transgenic seed contamination according to the complaint, and organic corn, soybean, cotton, sugar beet, and alfalfa face the same fate “as transgenic seed has been released by Monsanto for each of those crops.”

Among the sixty Davids, four plaintiffs stand out as parties who have already been damaged by the actions of the defendants, Monsanto Company and Monsanto Technology LLC.  If their allegations can be proven, a defense by Monsanto rooted in a “lack of ripeness” of the complaint would seem without merit.  Plaintiff North Outback Farm, an organic farm in Wales, North Dakota, owned and operated by Janet and Terry Jacobson, is a grain and livestock farm on which the Jacobsons grow alfalfa, wheat, oats and flax.  Their farm is in an area ideally suited for growing canola, but they cannot grow canola because of the widespread use of transgenic canola seed in their area posing a contamination threat for any organic canola crop they may wish to grow.  Similarly, Abundant Acres, a farm in Laclede County, Missouri primarily grows field crops for seed production.  In the past, the farm has grown corn and soybeans “but stopped for fear of transgenic contamination, and possible resultant litigation.”  Plaintiff Bryce Stephens, a certified organic farmer in Jennings, Kansas, whose farm has been certified organic since 1994, previously grew organic corn and soybeans, but discontinued those crops due to the threat of transgenic seed contamination.


06/04 Update

In this update:
– Dairy Classes and the Local Food Movement
– Rural Vermont Events – Dairy Classes & the Ice Cream Social Returns!
– Where to Find Rural Vermont this Summer

– Volunteer Opportunities

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DAIRY CLASSES and the LOCAL FOOD MOVEMENT
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Greetings! Now that the floods have begun to subside, we wanted to shoot you a quick update to remind you that this Wednesday, at Jersey Girls Dairy Farm in Chester,  Rural Vermont is hosting our first raw dairy processing class (and Ice Cream Social) since the new dairy class legislation was passed!  In addition to learning how to make ricotta cheese and enjoying ice cream, we will be discussing our upcoming campaign to help bring local food sovereignty back to Vermont communities, one town at a time.  Please take a look at our exciting list of upcoming events, and I hope to see you at the celebratory Ice Cream Social this Wednesday!

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RURAL VERMONT EVENTS!
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*** The Return of “Beyond Milk: Raw Dairy Processing Classes” !!!  THIS WEEK — THIS WEDNESDAY!!

Followed by a Victory Celebration & Ice Cream Social

Wednesday, June 8th at Jersey Girls Dairy, CHESTER

1 – 4 pm: Ice Cream & Ricotta Cheese with Mary Jane Rando & Susan Starr; advance registration necessary; $20-$40 sliding scale

Only a few spots left!! Call today to reserve your place! Don’t miss the very first class of the summer schedule, where ice cream aficionado Mary Jane Rando will lead a small group of raw milk enthusiasts through making raw milk ice cream using the rich and lovely cream from Jersey cows, followed by a lesson from master cheesemaker Susan Starr in transforming raw milk into luscious and versatile ricotta cheese. We’ll be churning out a big batch of ice cream, along with some raspberry sauce, to be served up at our victory celebration that very night (don’t worry; there will be plenty for sampling at the class too)! Class fee is $20-$40 sliding scale and advance registration is required. To sign up, call Shelby at (802) 223-7222 or email shelby@ruralvermont.org.

7 – 8:30 pm: ICE CREAM SOCIAL; come one, come all – FREE & open to the public

The weather forecast couldn’t be better for an evening ice cream gathering! Bring the whole family and join Rural Vermont and folks from near and far in celebrating the victory that brings back the wildly popular value-added dairy workshops! Local favorite and folk singer/songwriter Sam Creigh will provide some tunes about people and their relationships with each other and with the land of rural America (let’s request “The Hemp Song!”). Of course, there will be plenty of raw milk ice cream to go around, and a super “sweet” door prize! Spread the word and bring your friends (and some toppings, if you’re so inclined!) to help us celebrate the return of these educational workshops!! For more info, contact Shelby at (802) 223-7222 or shelby@ruralvermont.org.

Additional “Beyond Milk: Raw Dairy Processing Classes”:

JUST ADDED! Monday, June 20th / 1 – 4 pm / Yogurt, Yogurt Cheese, Ricotta, Creme Fraiche, & Ice Cream with Robin McDermott / Simplicity Farm, WAITSFIELD. Cosponsored by the Mad River Valley Localvore Project

JUST ADDED! Thursday, July 14th / 1 – 3 pm / Chevre – Making, Packaging, & Gift Giving / Foxwell Farm, NEWBURY

* Saturday, July 23rd / 1 – 4 pm / Butter, Yogurt, Whipped Cream, and Scones / Hawk’s Hill Farm, BARNARD

* Thursday, July 28th / 1 – 4 pm / Kefir, Ricotta, and Soft Serve Ice Cream with Goat’s Milk / Twin Acres Farm, RANDOLPH CENTER

* Saturday, August 13th / 1 – 4 pm / Butter, Yogurt, Whipped Cream, and Scones / Hawk’s Hill Farm, BARNARD

All classes require advance registration and space is limited. $20-$40 sliding scale. All proceeds benefit Rural Vermont.

To sign up OR to host/teach a class, contact Shelby at (802) 223-7222 or shelby@ruralvermont.org.

*** Farmer to Farmer Workshop Series

From Cow to Customer: Producing Raw Milk for Direct Sale

* Thursday, July 21st / 11 am – 3 pm / the home of Susanna & Joe Grannis, WEST TOWNSHEND

* Thursday, August 11th / 11 am – 3 pm / Symphony Farm, WASHINGTON

Rural Vermont is bringing back a series that we hosted last year to help current and aspiring raw milk farmers learn about the regulations governing the sale of raw milk, and provide an opportunity for folks to see them in practice on a successful raw milk micro dairy. RV staff will walk participants through the raw milk laws and farmer hosts will discuss production methods, marketing options, and lead a farm tour, followed by a raw milk and cookie session at the end of the day! Note: These workshops are applicable to goat, sheep, and cow dairies. Bring your questions, your experience, and your brown bag lunch! Each workshop costs $10 for Rural Vermont members, and $20 for all else (noone turned away for lack of funds). Pre-registration is highly recommended. Sign up by calling Rural Vermont at (802) 223-7222 or emailing shelby@ruralvermont.org.

*** Save the Date! the 4th Annual Tour de Farms! Sunday, September 18th, 2011! Shoreham, Vermont!
If you’ve never participated in the Tour de Farms or are feeling nostalgic about the event, check out this youtube video documenting the 2010 ride http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7mtg3AWhSo … and start daydreaming about the weather warming, gardens sprouting, and roads drying out in preparation for the 2011 event! Advance registration opens July 1st. Stay tuned for more info.

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WHERE TO FIND RURAL VERMONT THIS SUMMER!
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*** Visit Rural Vermont’s booth at the Growing Local Fest

Thursday, June 16th from 3 – 9 pm

on the SOUTH ROYALTON green

Check out this celebration of all things local! In addition to Rural Vermont’s booth, the event will feature an expanded farmers’ market, food vendors, a speaker on community-driven food systems, full day and night of live music, and workshops on wild edibles, solar & grease power, community radio, and composting. For more info, visit www.balevt.org.

*** FOOD PANEL moderated by Rural Vermont and hosted by the Village-building Convergence

Wednesday, June 15th at 6 pm

Hayes Room, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, MONTPELIER

Free, but donations to VbC welcomed!

Rural Vermont’s Organizer Robb Kidd will be the moderator of the VbC’s FOOD panel. Bring your questions, concerns, and friends for a lively and engaging discussion about all things related to Vermont food systems. The FOOD panel is just one of many events and projects sponsored by the 2011 VbC, which runs from June 10th – June 21st in and around Montpelier. The two week series kicks off with the Village Gathering and skill-sharing weekend Fri June 10th – Sun Jun 12th at Twin Pond Retreat Center in Brookfield. The Village-building Convergence is a project of Transition Town and at its root, VbC is about actively building community connections and realizing the strength and beauty of our power when we work and play together. For more info, http://vbc-vt.org/.


*** Visit Rural Vermont’s booth at Cedar Circle Farm’s Strawberry Festival

Sunday, June 26th from 10 am – 4 pm

225 Pavillion Rd., EAST THETFORD

Family Fun, Rain or Shine!
Get ready to celebrate strawberry season at the 9th annual Strawberry Fest! Cedar Circle has invited Rural Vermont to be on hand to talk about the steps that we’re taking to secure a solid and stable future for VT’s family farms. Come visit with us and check out live music, horse-drawn wagon rides, educational displays, a self-guided farm tour, farm-made food concessions, fresh salads, organic local ice cream, children’s activities, and more!

*** Visit Rural Vermont’s booth at the Windsor County Agricultural Fair

July 9th & 10th

Barlow’s Field on Eureka Rd., SPRINGFIELD

Visit with Rural Vermont at the “Best Little Fair in Vermont” all weekend long! Get updates on our campaigns, event schedule, and upcoming activities. Pick up some Rural Vermont merchandise, renew your membership, or just catch up with the staff and Board.

*** Rural Vermont presents “Raw Milk: Sustainable Dairy in Practice and Policy” Workshop at SolarFest!
with Rural Vermont Organizer Robb Kidd and Jersey Girls Dairy farmer Lisa Kaiman

Saturday, July 16th from 11am – 12pm

Sustainable Agriculture Tent, Forget Me Not Farm, TINMOUTH
$30 for Saturday only SolarFest pass, $65 weekend pass. Senior, youth and student discounts available, children under 12 free

*** Rural Vermont partners with the Intervale for Summervale!
Thursday, August 4th at 5:30 pm
Intervale – 180 Intervale Rd., BURLINGTON
Formerly Thursdays at the Intervale, the Summervale series runs from June through the end of August. On Thurs, Aug 4th, Rural Vermont is the Intervale’s featured partner and will be on hand to chat about raw milk, on-farm slaughter, food sovereignty, and any other ag policy questions or concerns you’ve got! Head to the Calkins Community Barn for a leisurely evening with live music, kids activities, and yummy garden goodies in the setting of the historic farmstead, minutes from downtown Burlington. Bring your own picnic dinner, or purchase American Flatbread pizza and beer onsite. For more info, visit http://www.intervale.org/.

*** Visit Rural Vermont’s booth at the Peru Fair
Saturday, September 24th from 9 am til 4 pm
in the village of PERU
$5 entry
Come visit the Rural Vermont booth – get updates and buy your RV merchandise – at this old fashioned country fair. Around since 1978, the fair has been deemed one of “Vermont’s Top Ten events”. Expect a parade, tons of artists and crafters, Vermont fare, antiques & art exhibits, and the famous pig roast. For more info, visit http://www.perufair.org/Peru_Fair/Home.html.

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VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
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Posters- We need help putting up posters for the above events! Email and we will send you posters via email, or call and we will send some in the mail.

Join us at your local Markets and Fairs- We will be at events all throughout the state, and the best way to get your neighbors involved is through your involvement, so consider tabling at an event with Rural Vermont staff and volunteers this summer.

At the Rural Vermont Office- If you prefer, we have plenty of office related tasks. All help is gratefully appreciated.

Contact Robb at robb@ruralvermont.org, or call 802-223-7222 to get involved today!!!


Rural Vermont’s Raw Dairy Classes Come to the Valley: Yogurt, Cheese & Ice Cream at Simplicity Farm 6/20

Rural Vermont’s wildly popular “Beyond Milk: Raw Dairy Processing” workshops make their first appearance in the Mad River Valley on June 20th from 1-4 pm at Simplicity Farm in Waitsfield. Rural Vermont and the Mad River Valley Localvore Project partner to host a class taught by Robin McDermott and featuring yogurt, yogurt cheese, ricotta, crème fraiche, & ice cream.

The class fee is $20 – 40 sliding scale, and proceeds benefit Rural Vermont. Pre-registration is required, class size is limited, and this class is sure to sell out. Get in touch today to reserve your spot by calling Rural Vermont at (802) 223-7222 or emailing shelby@ruralvermont.org.

Robin McDermott will lead a small group of folks through the process of churning rich and creamy raw milk into all kinds of dairy products for good eating at home. Robin says, “I have been making various dairy products for several years now and have settled on recipes and techniques that are easy to do and work well.”

Robin McDermott is a co-founder of the Mad River Valley Localvore Project and is passionate about local food and the people who grow, raise and produce it.  She regularly makes yogurt, ricotta and ice cream in her home kitchen in Waitsfield.

Simplicity Farm is a multi-generational organic dairy farm located in the heart of the Mad River Valley.  It is currently owned and operated by 3rd generation father Douglas Turner with a transition in the coming years to 4th generation son Joseph Turner.  The Turners take great pride in being local farmers and working the land their family farmed before them. They milk just shy of 50 milking cows, while raising heifers, and growing hay and other feed crops. They are also completing their first year of welcoming and hosting the Waitsfield Cows 4-H Dairy Club.  They sell eggs, chicken, and raw milk, available during milking hours (6:30-8:30 am or pm).  Please bring your own milk container, and look for them in the barn!

Rural Vermont is scheduling dairy classes throughout the summer, including “Chevre – Making, Packaging & Gift-giving” on July 14th at Foxwell Farm in Newbury, “Butter, Yogurt, Whipped Cream, and Scones” on July 23rd and August 13th at Hawk’s Hill Farm in Barnard, and “Kefir, Ricotta, and Soft Serve with Goat’s Milk” on July 28th at Twin Acres in Randolph Center. More classes are added weekly – check the Rural Vermont website for the most recent info or call to be added to the mailing list.

Rural Vermont is a statewide nonprofit group founded by farmers in 1985. For the last 25 years, Rural Vermont has been advancing its mission of economic justice for Vermont farmers through advocacy and education. For more info call (802) 223-7222.


08/11-09/17 Farmer to Farmer Workshop Series

From Cow to Consumer: Producing Raw Milk for Direct Sale
August 11th from 11am-3pm at Symphony Farm, Washington
Rural Vermont hosts this on-farm workshop and invites current and aspiring farmers to tour a raw milk microdairy. See, share, and learn best practices for cow care, microdairy management, and the direct sale of up to 50 quarts of raw milk per day.
AND
August 22nd / 11 am – 3 pm at Bob White Systems, SOUTH ROYALTON
(note: Bob White Systems is both a business that develops and sells microdairy equipment, as well as a microdairy operation)
AND
September 17th from 11 am – 3 pm at New Village Farm, SHELBURNE
Advance registration preferred
$10 for Rural Vermont members, $20 all else

Current and aspiring raw milk farmers will learn about the regulations governing the sale of raw milk and see them in practice on a successful raw milk micro dairy. Applicable to goat, sheep, and cow dairies. Bring your bag lunch, and we’ll provide milk and cookies! Additional date/location in the works!

To sign up, call 802-223-7222 or email shelby@ruralvermont.org


07/14 Making Chevre (Goats' Milk)

Beyond Milk: Raw Dairy Processing Class
Foxwell Farm, Newbury
1-3pm
Pre-registration required with a $20-40 sliding scale fee.

All proceeds benefit Rural Vermont. To sign up for the class or for more information, call Rural Vermont at (802) 223-7222 or e-mail shelby@ruralvermont.org.


06/20 Yogurt, Yogurt Cheese, Ricotta, Creme Fraiche, & Ice Cream

Beyond Milk: Raw Dairy Processing Class
Simplicity Farm, Waitsfield
1-4pm
Pre-registration required with a $20-40 sliding scale fee.

Rural Vermont’s wildly popular “Beyond Milk: Raw Dairy Processing” workshops make their first appearance in the Mad River Valley on June 20th from 1-4 pm at Simplicity Farm in Waitsfield. Rural Vermont and the Mad River Valley Localvore Project partner to host a class taught by Robin McDermott and featuring yogurt, yogurt cheese, ricotta, crème fraiche, & ice cream.

The class fee is $20 – 40 sliding scale, and proceeds benefit Rural Vermont. Pre-registration is required, class size is limited, and this class is sure to sell out. Get in touch today to reserve your spot by calling Rural Vermont at (802) 223-7222 or emailing shelby@ruralvermont.org.

Robin McDermott will lead a small group of folks through the process of churning rich and creamy raw milk into all kinds of dairy products for good eating at home. Robin says, “I have been making various dairy products for several years now and have settled on recipes and techniques that are easy to do and work well.”

Robin McDermott is a co-founder of the Mad River Valley Localvore Project and is passionate about local food and the people who grow, raise and produce it. She regularly makes yogurt, ricotta and ice cream in her home kitchen in Waitsfield.

Simplicity Farm is a multi-generational organic dairy farm located in the heart of the Mad River Valley. It is currently owned and operated by 3rd generation father Douglas Turner with a transition in the coming years to 4th generation son Joseph Turner. The Turners take great pride in being local farmers and working the land their family farmed before them. They milk just shy of 50 milking cows, while raising heifers, and growing hay and other feed crops. They are also completing their first year of welcoming and hosting the Waitsfield Cows 4-H Dairy Club. They sell eggs, chicken, and raw milk, available during milking hours (6:30-8:30 am or pm). Please bring your own milk container, and look for them in the barn!


Bob-White Systems

Bob-White Systems, a leader in innovative dairy technology, equipment, and expertise, now includes a private, multi-purpose dairy and food testing lab. We are a local Vermont company dedicated to the production of safe and delicious farm-fresh milk and dairy products. In addition to our lab facilities, we offer a full range of new and used dairy equipment including bulk tanks, bucket milkers, and milking supplies. We also sell cheese making and other dairy processing supplies. Beginning summer 2013, we will be selling an innovative small-scale, gentle HTST pasteurizer. More information can be found at http://bobwhitesystems.com/ or call 802-763-2777.


Linnekin: Mopping up the raw-milk mob

By Baylen J. Linnekin
The Washington Times
Friday, May 13, 2011
Full Article

Federal agents watched the home closely for a year, gathering evidence. Then, in a pre-dawn raid, armed members from three agencies swooped in.

No, this is not a retelling of the lightning U.S. commando attack in Abbottabad, Pakistan, that killed terrorist leader Osama bin Laden. Rather, the target of the raid late last month by U.S. marshals, a state police trooper and inspectors from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was Amish farmer Dan Allgyer of Kinzers, Pa. His so-called “crime” involved nothing more than providing unpasteurized, or raw, dairy milk to eager consumers here in the Washington area.

The sting operation against Mr. Allgyer’s Rainbow Acres Farm has touched a nerve around the country and across the ideological divide. Mr. Allgyer’s customers – including a soccer mom I know – are outraged. Former Sen. Fred Thompson, Tennessee Republican, took to Twitter recently to blast the raid, calling it a waste of time and resources and mockingly suggesting the FDA would do better to shut down the “many unlicensed lemonade stands” operating around the country. Author David Gumpert, writing at the left-of-center environmental website Grist, wondered whether those who took part in the raid felt “remorse or shame” over this “official effort to deprive people of food.” On May 11, Rep. Ron Paul, Texas Republican, introduced H.R. 1830, the Unpasteurized Milk Bill, which would end the FDA’s ban and permit the sale of raw milk across state lines.

What could possibly be the rationale behind this FDA action? The agency banned the interstate sale of raw milk in 1987. It says raw milk can contain harmful pathogens such as listeria and that pasteurized milk is safer.

No one disputes that pasteurization helps kill harmful pathogens. But where the FDA claims to see a mountain, most states see a molehill. Nearly 25 years after the FDA policy was instituted, just 11 states ban raw milk within their own borders.

Many critics question why the agency concerns itself with raw milk. After all, virtually any food can conceivably contain harmful pathogens – including beef, poultry, pork, seafood, fruits and vegetables. Yet the FDA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) permit the overwhelming majority of these products to be sold in their raw forms. For example, the USDA, which regulates beef, pork and poultry, permits their sale in raw and cooked forms. The FDA, which regulates seafood and eggs, likewise permits those to be sold raw or cooked.

The FDA’s raid on Dan Allgyer’s farm has united people across party lines who see his right to provide customers with raw milk as part of a larger and expanding battle over the right of people to grow, raise, buy, sell, cook and eat the foods of their own choosing. The FDA, which is seeking a federal court order to bar Mr. Allgyer from offering raw milk to his customers, is increasingly on the wrong side in that battle.


Rural Vermont’s Raw Dairy Classes Resume: Victory Celebration & Ice Cream Social June 8th in Chester

Rural Vermont’s wildly popular “Beyond Milk: Raw Dairy Processing” workshops return after a long hiatus with a special class on Wednesday, June 8th, followed by a Raw Milk Victory Celebration and Ice Cream Social, at Jersey Girls Dairy, located at 157 Thompson Rd. in Chester, VT.

The class is scheduled from 1 – 4 pm and participants will learn to make raw milk ice cream and ricotta cheese, with the guidance of Jersey Girls farmer Lisa Kaiman and local foods enthusiast Mary Jane Rando. This hands-on class will give folks the opportunity to churn Jersey girls’ rich and lovely cream into everyone’s favorite summer treat, followed by a lesson using the skim milk byproduct to make luscious and versatile ricotta cheese. The class fee is $20 – 40 sliding scale, and proceeds benefit Rural Vermont. Pre-registration is required, class size is limited, and this class is sure to sell out. Get in touch today to reserve your spot by calling Rural Vermont at (802) 223-7222 or emailing shelby@ruralvermont.org.

Following the social will be a Raw Milk Victory Celebration from 7 – 8:30 pm. Everyone is welcome to head over to Jersey Girls Dairy to celebrate the signing of S.105 with live music, a door prize, and raw milk ice cream freshly made just hours prior at the dairy class! This event is rain or shine and free (donations kindly appreciated).

S.105, the dubbed “dairy class bill”, restores farmers’ ability to sell raw milk and protects the rights of Vermonters to learn about and make raw milk dairy products in the privacy of their own kitchens.

Speaking about the weight of this victory, Jersey Girls farmer and host Lisa Kaiman says, “The dairy classes are a win-win-win in my opinion – the customer gets even further benefit from already superior product, the raw milk, if that’s even possible, the farmers in turn sell more milk, and Rural Vermont is largely responsible for both the ability to sell raw milk and now, the option of making stuff with it!! Raw milk – it’s not just for drinking anymore!!”

Rural Vermont is scheduling dairy classes throughout the summer, including “Butter, Yogurt, Whipped Cream, and Scones” on July 23rd and August 13th at Hawk’s Hill Farm in Barnard, and “Kefir, Ricotta, and Soft Serve with Goat’s Milk” on July 28th at Twin Acres in Randolph Center. More classes are added weekly – check the Rural Vermont website for the most recent info or call to be added to the mailing list.

Rural Vermont is a statewide nonprofit group founded by farmers in 1985. For the last 25 years, Rural Vermont has been advancing its mission of economic justice for Vermont farmers through advocacy and education. For more info, call (802) 223-7222.

Lisa Kaiman shows off a batch of freshly made soft cheese at a previous dairy processing class


08/13 Butter, Yogurt, Whipped Cream, and Scones

Beyond Milk: Raw Dairy Processing Class
Hawk’s Hill Farm in Barnard
Saturday, August 13th from 1-4 pm.
Pre-registration required with a $20-40 sliding scale fee.

Rural Vermont’s raw dairy processing classes return! Learn how to make raw milk butter, yogurt, whipped cream & buttermilk scones at Hawk’s Hill Farm in Barnard. All proceeds benefit Rural Vermont. For more information, read the press release here. To sign up, call Rural Vermont at (802) 223-7222 or e-mail shelby@ruralvermont.org.